items
* Free shipping to ANZ only
Install to view this content
Joan Beaumont's Broken Nation wins two major literary awards

Joan Beaumont's Broken Nation wins two major literary awards

We are delighted to announce that Joan Beaumont's Broken Nation: Australians in the Great War picked up History prizes at both the Prime Minister's Literary Awards and the Queensland Literary Awards.

Broken Nation took the University of Southern Queensland History Book Award in Queensland, while in the Prime Minister's Literary Awards, Beaumont's book shared the prize for Australian History, with judges saying that the book "takes a fresh approach to a well-known story".

To celebrate, for a limited time we're offering the hardback edition of Broken Nation for the paperback price.

Spotlight:

Behind the Gates of Gomorrah

by Stephen Seager

A extraordinary, eye-opening look behind the razor wire into life inside the walls of one of the most notorious hospitals for the criminally insane, a hellish world inhabited by mass murderers, serial killers, and other figures from our nightmares.

Spotlight:

The Lion's Mouth

by Anne Holt

Hanne Wilhelmsen's fourth investigation brings her into conflict with the highest powers in Norway: what secrets lie behind the death of the Prime Minister?

Spotlight:

Diary of a Golf Pro

by Shamini Flint

Marcus is a maths whiz who is not good at sport. His dad is a self-help author who thinks Marcus can achieve anything he sets his mind to - with hilarious results.

Out now
Coming soon
Spotlight:

Anders and the Comet

by Gregory Mackay

Meet Anders, Eden and their new friend, Bernie. It's the school holidays, and there are comics to be made, games to be played, ice-cream to be eaten, and rhinos to impress at Wekiwa water park.

Then Anders and his friends meet the Green Grabber and things take on a whole new twist, leading Anders to a wonderful pet, Skip, and to wild adventures - and a dramatic rescue - in the sky.

An endearing story of fun, friendship and unexpected courage.

Spotlight:

Love and other Perishable Items

by Laura Buzo

From the moment 15-year-old Amelia gets an after-school job at the local supermarket she is sunk, gone, lost, head-over-heels in love with Chris. Chris is the funny, charming, man-about-Woolies - but he's 21 and in his final year at uni. The six- year age gap may as well be a hundred.

Chris and Amelia talk about everything from Second Wave Feminism to Great Expectations and Alien, but will he ever look at her in the way she wants him to?

A story that's real and warm and just a little bit heartbreaking.

Spotlight:

The Internet is Not the Answer

by Andrew Keen

The worldwide web is now a quarter of a century old. Invented in 1989, there can be no doubt that the web, and the new businesses it has enabled, has transformed the world. But, according to Andrew Keen, this disruption has been a terrible failure. In The Internet is not the Answer, Keen has written a sharp, witty polemic proving that, so far, the web has been mostly a disaster for everyone except a tiny group of young privileged white male Silicon Valley multi-millionaires.

Rather than making us wealthier, the unregulated digital market is making us all poorer. Rather than generating jobs, it is causing unemployment. Rather than holding our rulers to account, it is creating a brightly lit, radically transparent prison in which everything we do is recorded. Rather than promoting democracy, it is empowering mob rule. And rather than fostering a new renaissance, it is encouraging a culture of distraction, vulgarity and narcissism.

So what is to be done? The next twenty-five years are key, Keen explains, because, by 2040, everyone alive will be online. In The Internet is not the Answer, he disrupts the disrupters by laying out a five-part solution to the crisis. He says we need to rethink the web, revive government authority, rebuild the value of content, resurrect privacy and, above all, reconceive humanity. The stakes couldn't be higher, he warns. If we do nothing at all, this new technology and the companies that control it will continue to impoverish us all.

Spotlight:

Humans: An A-Z

by Matt Haig

DO YOU
A) Know a human?
B) Love a human?
C) Have trouble dealing with humans?

IF YOU'VE ANSWERED YES TO ANY OF THE ABOVE, THIS BOOK IS FOR YOU

Whether you are planning a high level of human interaction or just a casual visit to the planet, this user-guide to the human race will help you translate their sayings, understand exotic concepts such as 'democracy' and 'sofas', and make sense of their habits and bizarre customs.

A phrase book, a dictionary and a survival guide, this book unravels all the oddness, idiosyncrasies and wonder of the species, allowing everyone to make the most of their time on Earth.

Spotlight:

Volcano Street

by David Rain

'What would Germaine do?'

This is the mantra that Skip and Marlo Wells turn to as they navigate their way through the twists and turns that life brings. Such as the sectioning of their mother Karen Jane. Marlo puts her faith in her hero, Germaine Greer, and twelve-year-old Skip trusts her clever big sister to know the right thing to do. But when the sisters are forced to move to their Auntie Noreen and Uncle Doug's home in the backwater city of Crater Lakes even Marlo can't think of a solution. At age sixteen, Marlo is forced to quit school and work in the family hardware store. Skip manages to get on her auntie's bad side from the get-go and is an outcast at school as she vehemently declares the injustice of the Vietnam War - not what Noreen wants to hear with her precious son Barry off fighting.

Against the backdrop of a broken home, the fight for equality and a far off war Volcano Street is a heartfelt tale of acceptance and belonging, and learning what family truly means.

Spotlight:

Sciku

by edited by, edited by Simon Flynn

Physics, Chemistry and Biology are things of magic and wonder. They reveal complex patterns - and often thrilling chaos - at the heart of nature; the strange alchemy of reactions between invisible atoms; the bewildering origins of our universe in the furthest reaches of time and the connections in our brains that create love, fear, joy - and poetry.

Sciku brings together more than 400 revealing, poignant, witty haiku on scientific subjects. Written by students at Camden School for Girls - with all royalties from the sale of this book donated to the campaign to modernize their school science laboratory - these poems show that science may have given us the atom bomb, the laptop and the artificial heart but that it remains elegiac, enigmatic and often mind- bogglingly beautiful.

Photosynthesis:

Carbon dioxide

And water combine to form

Glucose thanks to light

Spotlight:

Before I Go

by Colleen Oakley

'And suddenly what's clearer to me than the glowing orb on that PET scan is that this is now the number one thing on my to-do list. Jack needs a wife. And I am going to find him one.'

Daisy is 27-years-old and has only months to live. And, each day, she's finding her way through her lists of what needs to be done.

Her major worry is what her wonderful, charming husband, Jack, will do without her. It's this fear that keeps her up at night, until she stumbles upon the obvious solution. She knows that he won't take care of himself so Daisy has to do it for him: she has to find him another wife.

As she searches with singular determination for the right woman, she begins to realise that her plan to ensure Jack's happiness is much more complicated than she expected.

Life-affirming, authentic, funny and heartbreakingly beautiful, Before I Go is all about love.

'...the emotion always rings true.' Kirkus Review

Spotlight:

The Social Diary

by Ros Reines

When Savannah Stephens returns to her hometown Sydney after a stint as a music journalist in London, she is thrown into the burgeoning world of society parties and the excesses of the eighties social scene.

Savannah's first job back on home soil is as the editor of the newly created Social Diary. Her days are spent battling old fashioned newspaper colleagues, who frown upon the so-called 'women's pages' and tut when her stories make front page splashes.

By night she is awash in a sea of expensive champagne at the biggest and best parties the city has to offer. It is there that she collides with the unbelievable characters and larger-than-life personalities who are fast becoming legendary for their jaw-dropping antics.

Will Savannah manage to prove her critics wrong or will she be distracted by a very handsome yet mysterious man?

Funny and satirical, The Social Diary reads at times like an extended version of Ros Reines' real-life gossip column feature Guess Who Don't Sue, and is written by someone who has been through it all and lived to tell the tale.

Spotlight:

Becoming Westerly

by Jamie Brisick

'Peter was always looking for a princess, he wanted to find his princess. Unfortunately, the princess was me. I'm the princess that Peter always wanted but never met.' Westerly Windina

'Westerly's affection for Peter comes in many guises. Most of the time it's wistful and forlorn. When she talks about his awkwardness, his pretending to be something he was not, she sounds like a mother remembering her deceased child.' Jamie Brisick, from Becoming Westerly

Peter Drouyn was a champion surfer with a touch of genius who forever changed the face of surfing by introducing the concept of the man-on-man competition format. Known for his aggressive yet elegant style on the wave, Drouyn was also a lawyer, heartthrob actor and showman extraordinaire, famous for his eccentric behaviour and ambitious ideas.

For nearly a decade now, Peter Drouyn has been living as a woman, Westerly Windina. The surfing community is at once awestruck, sceptical and supportive. As one renowned surf journalist put it, 'Is this Peter's greatest performance ever?' In a recent issue of Surfing World, surfers voted Peter/Westerly 'the most interesting surfer in the world'. And the world is taking notice.

Beginning with her 2012 trip to Bangkok for gender reassignment surgery, Becoming Westerly retraces Peter Drouyn's odyssey from teenage Queensland hopeful to 1960s global surfing sensation to embittered, middle-age has-been to the phoenix-like, glamorous, sixty-four-year-old Westerly. As Westerly herself notes, 'It was like a Supernova. It just kicked in one night and, bang, Peter was gone and Westerly was there... Part biography, part memoir, part documentary, part saga, Becoming Westerly is as much an exploration of surf culture and Australian society as it is of sexual identity. But most of all it is a portrait of two extraordinary people in one, and a very personal account of the courage and self-belief it has taken for Peter to become Westerly.

Spotlight:

Still Travelling

by Mal Leyland

'At a time when the outback was still a forbidding, remote frontier, the Leyland brothers brought it into people's homes through their many documentaries and successful television series. In doing so they persuaded thousands of Aussies out on to the road, starting the four-wheel-drive revolution and contributing to a huge recreational industry.' Neil McDonald, Herald-Sun

Mike and Mal Leyland's first step towards becoming beloved Aussie icons came with the screening of their hazardous trip down the length of the Darling River in a five-metre aluminium dinghy. They went on to have numerous adventures, culminating in their ground-breaking TV series, Ask the Leyland Brothers, in which they travelled to unusual or far-flung places around Australia at viewers' requests.

In this revealing memoir, Mal Leyland takes us through his eventful life, from his 'ten-pound-Pom' immigrant childhood, adventuring with Mike through outback Australia, the brothers' sometimes stormy relationship, their dramatic rise to success as filmmakers, their devastating financial losses, Mal's triumph over cancer to his ongoing travels with his beloved wife of 45 years, Laraine.

Ever the adventurer, Mal Leyland has continued to explore our beautiful and dangerous country. Still Travelling is his compelling account of a life lived to the full.

Spotlight:

And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda

by Eric Bogle, illustrated by Bruce Whatley

But the band played 'Waltzing Matilda' when we stopped to bury our slain. We buried ours, and the Turks buried theirs; then we started all over again.

Eric Bogle's famous and familiar Australian song about the Battle of Gallipoli explores the futility of war with haunting power. Now Bruce Whatley's evocative illustrations bring a heart-rending sense of reality to the tale.

A timely story for every generation to share.

Spotlight:

A Small Madness

by Dianne Touchell

Rose didn't tell anyone about it. She wondered if it showed. She looked at herself in the mirror and turned this way and then that way. She stood as close to the mirror as she could, leaning over the bathroom basin, looking into her own eyes until they disappeared behind the fog of her breath. Looking for something. Some evidence that she was different now. Something had shifted inside her, a gear being ratcheted over a clunky cog, gaining torque, starting her up. But it didn't show. How could all of these feelings not show? She was a woman now but it didn't show and she couldn't tell anyone.

-->