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The CBCA 2014 Awards

The CBCA 2014 Awards

The winners of the Children's Book Council of Australia 2014 Book of the Year Awards were announced and we are delighted that A Very Unusual Pursuit: City of Orphans by Catherine Jinks was selected as the Winner for the Younger Readers category.

My Life As An Alphabet by Barry Jonsberg was honour listed also for the Younger Readers Category and Welcome to My Country by Laklak Burarrwanga and family was honour listed for the Eve Pownall Award for Information Books.

Congratulations for everyone involved.

See all the winners and Honour Books here
Spotlight:

This Picture of You

by Sarah Hopkins

Gripping, insightful and moving - a searing story of love and betrayal, and a family coming apart at the seams.

Spotlight:

Sell Up, Pack Up and Take Off

by Stephen Wyatt and Colleen Ryan

Bali? Thailand? Spain? France? Is living in a beautiful, exotic location a completely impossible dream? Not with this sensible and practical guide to the how, why and when of establishing a new life overseas.

Spotlight:

Rain Dance

by Karen Wood

An addictive rural romance for teens from the author of Jumping Fences.

Out now
Coming soon
Spotlight:

The Year It All Ended

by Kirsty Murray

On Tiney Flynn's seventeenth birthday, every church bell tolled as if heralding a new year, a new era. Tiney stood in the garden, purple jacaranda petals fluttering down around her. One by one, her sisters came outside to join her; first Nette, then Minna and lastly Thea. It was 11 November 1918. Armistice Day.

For Tiney and her sisters, everything is about to change, but not in the way they might have imagined. Building peace is complicated; so is growing up. From tragedy to undreamt-of joy, from weddings to s?ances, from masked balls to riots in the streets, Tiney?s world will be transformed.

At the end of the war and the dawn of the Jazz Age, Tiney Flynn must face her greatest fears and begin a journey that will change her destiny.

?I loved this book for its emotional intensity, for the strong, believable characters and for its accurate portrayal of a period in history so often forgotten.? Maureen McCarthy

Spotlight:

Whale in the Bath

by Kylie Westaway, illustrated by Tom Jellett

'Bruno, get in the bath!'

It's bathtime, but there's a whale in the tub and Bruno can't get in! No one in his family believes him and Bruno keeps being sent back to the bathroom until, at last, Bruno and the whale work out a very splashy solution.

A wonderful story that humorously explores bathtime and a playful celebration of a child's imagination.

Spotlight:

The Thing About Prague ...

by Rachael Weiss

?I?d like to say that my decision to move to Prague permanently was based on something grand and noble - a desire to trace my roots, a sense of adventure, my literary heart yearning to burst into flower in the sweet soil of Old Europe - but I can?t. The truth is that I had nothing better to do.?

When Rachael Weiss left a good job, Thelma the cat and a normal life in Sydney for the romantic dream of being a writer in Prague she intended to stay forever. She lasted just three years, exasperated by the eccentricities of her ancestral city and the mind-boggling bureaucracy and customs of a country that values beer and potatoes above everything else.

In this surprising and generous memoir full of warmth and unstoppable sociability, Rachael attempts to write her great novel, buy an apartment (any apartment!), dodge unscrupulous employers, and perhaps find love. She gets lost in the woods with a Kyrgyzstani software engineer who wants to eat humans, finds herself leading services at the Spanish synagogue with no real idea of what she was doing and spends long nights drinking beer with a colourful cast of crazy, warm and slightly mad locals and expats.

Rich in absurdities and gentle humour, The Thing About Pragueis rife with insight, culture clashes, friendships and above all charm.

Spotlight:

How to Speak Money

by John Lanchester

The biggest problem for outsiders in the world of economics is that most of the time, we don't know what the hell the insiders are talking about. To know that, you have to understand the words they're using. The language of economic elites can be complex, jargon-filled and completely baffling.

But if we don't know what they're talking about, we're making our decisions at the ballot box on insufficient information. We all need to be able to speak money because if we can't, then the people who can will write their own rules. Their preference is for no rules at all. We've given that approach a try, and we can testify to the fact that it doesn't work.

In How to Speak Money, John Lanchester explains everything from high-frequency trading to the difference between bullshit and nonsense. This is a primer, a polemic and a reference book you'll find yourself reading in one sitting. It blows open the world of finance and arms you with knowledge, ready for the moment they try to sell us the Next Big Thing.

Spotlight:

Tumbledown Manor

by Helen Brown

Life's going down the gurgler for romance writer Lisa Trumperton. The deadline for her next novel is looming, her daughter won't eat but has a new tattoo each week, and now her Wall Street trader husband has run off with a woman at work.

Lisa makes a quick escape, home to Australia, where at least her girl-magnet son seems to be making hay. Determined to grow older disgracefully, she turns her back on a trim and tidy townhouse that is close to shops, aged-care providers and her bossy older sister, instead buying a grand old house in the country that once belonged to her great-grandfather.

But like its new owner, Trumperton Manor has seen better days. Crumbling, filthy and possibly haunted, the old house defies Lisa's attempts to restore it. Add flood, fire and family secrets, plus a stray cat with attitude and an overly familiar handyman, and the cracks begin to show. . .

Richly observed and laugh-out-loud funny, Tumbledown Manor is for anyone who believes it's never too late for a makeover.

Spotlight:

Lucky Us

by Amy Bloom

When Eva's mother abandons her on Iris's front porch, the girls don't seem to have much in common - except, they soon discover, a father. Thrown together with no mothers to care for them and a father who could not be considered a parent, Iris and Eva become one another's family. Iris wants to be a movie star; Eva is her sidekick. Together, they journey across 1940s America from scandal in Hollywood to the jazz clubs and golden mansions of Long Island, stumbling, cheating and loving their way through a landscape of war, betrayals and big dreams.

Spotlight:

Leaving Time

by Jodi Picoult

Alice Metcalf was a devoted mother, loving wife and accomplished scientist who studied grief among elephants. Yet it's been a decade since she disappeared under mysterious circumstances, leaving behind her small daughter, husband, and the animals to which she devoted her life. All signs point to abandonment - or worse.

Still Jenna - now thirteen years old and truly orphaned by a father maddened by grief - steadfastly refuses to believe in her mother's desertion. So she decides to approach the two people who might still be able to help her find Alice: a disgraced psychic named Serenity Jones, and Virgil Stanhope, the cynical detective who first investigated her mother's disappearance and the strange, possibly linked death of one of her mother's coworkers.

Together these three lonely souls will discover truths destined to forever change their lives. Deeply moving and suspenseful, Jodi Picoult's 21st novel is a radiant exploration of the enduring love between mothers and daughters.

Spotlight:

Clariel

by Garth Nix

Clariel is the daughter of one of the most notable families in the Old Kingdom, with blood relations to the Abhorsen, and to the King. When her family moves to the city of Belisaere, Clariel finds herself at the centre of sorcery and intrigue: a plot is brewing against the old and withdrawn King Orrikan; her parents want to marry her off to a killer; and a dangerous Free Magic creature is loose in the city. When Clariel is drawn into the efforts to find and capture the creature, she finds hidden sorcery within herself, yet it is magic that carries great dangers. Can she rise above the temptation of power, escape the unwanted marriage and save the King?

Set approximately six hundred years before the birth of Sabriel, Clariel will delight Old Kingdom fans as well as new readers hungry for epic fantasy adventure.

'Beautifully written, magnificently imagined, and wholly original, Clariel is Garth Nix's finest work yet.' - Holly Black, New York Times bestselling author of The Coldest Girl in Coldtown

'In this long-awaited prequel, Garth Nix shows us why his Old Kingdom books have influenced a generation of fantasy writers.' - Cassandra Clare, New York Times bestselling author of the Mortal Instruments and Infernal Devices series

Spotlight:

To Name Those Lost

by Rohan Wilson

Summer 1874, and Launceston teeters on the brink of anarchy. After abandoning his wife and child many years ago, the Black War veteran Thomas Toosey must return to the city to search for William, his now motherless twelve-year-old son. He travels through the island's northern districts during a time of impossible hardship - hardship that has left its mark on him too. Arriving in Launceston, however, Toosey discovers a town in chaos. He is desperate to find his son amid the looting and destruction, but at every turn he is confronted by the Irish transportee Fitheal Flynn and his companion, the hooded man, to whom Toosey owes a debt that he must repay.

To Name Those Lost is the story of a father's journey. Wilson has an eye for the dirt, the hardness, the sheer dog-eat-doggedness of the lives of the poor. Human nature is revealed in all its horror and beauty as Thomas Toosey struggles with the good and the vile in himself and learns what he holds important.

Spotlight:

Cooper Bartholomew is Dead

by Rebecca James

Cooper Bartholomew's body is found at the foot of a cliff.

Suicide.

That's the official finding, that's what everyone believes. Cooper's girlfriend, Libby, has her doubts. They'd been happy, in love. Why would he take his own life?

As Libby searches for answers, and probes more deeply into what really happened the day Cooper died, she and her friends unravel a web of deception and betrayal. Are those friends - and enemies - what they seem? Who is hiding a dangerous secret? And will the truth set them all free?

A gripping new novel from the author of Beautiful Malice and Sweet Damage.

Spotlight:

Dog Eat Dog

by Michael Browning

Bon turned up with two bottles of bourbon, some dope and some speed. When Angus saw this stash, he said to Malcolm, 'If this guy can walk, let alone sing, it's going to be something.'

Michael Browning first spotted AC/DC in September 1974. They were raw and rough, and much of the crowd, Michael included, was bewildered by the flashy guitarist dressed as a school kid. But Michael knew they had something - a blistering sound, killer songs and a wildly charismatic stage presence. Within a week he'd signed them to a management contract and duly embarked on a shared journey that within five years would take them to international prominence.

A young street kid with an uncanny ear for music, Michael had kicked off his career in the swinging clubs that made Melbourne the most happening place in Australia in the '60s. He'd also been at the forefront of 'pub rock' in the early '70s, booking acts like The Loved Ones and Max Merritt and the Meteors, and managing the massive band, Billy Thorpe and the Aztecs.

And then AC/DC swept all before them. Here is the only insider account of those amazing years by the man who helped guide AC/DC to the top.

In the '80s Michael did it again, signing an up-and-coming band called INXS to his label Deluxe Records and setting them on the course to superstardom.

Dog Eat Dog is the story of one of the true believers of the Australian music industry, the man who helped the country's two biggest bands achieve world domination...and lived to tell the tale.

Spotlight:

Walking Free

by Munjed Al Muderis and Patrick Weaver

In 1999, Munjed Al Muderis was a young surgical resident working in Baghdad when a squad of Military Police marched into the operating theatre and ordered the surgical team to mutilate the ears of three busloads of army deserters. When the head of surgery refused, he was executed in front of his staff. Munjed's choices were stark-comply and breach the medical oath 'do no harm', refuse and face certain death, or flee.

That day, Munjed's life changed forever. He escaped to Indonesia, where he boarded a filthy, overcrowded refugee boat, bound for Australia.

Like his fellow passengers, he hoped for a new life, free from fear and oppression, but for ten months he was incarcerated in what became known as the worst of the refugee camps, Curtin Detention Centre in Western Australia. There he was known only by a number, locked in solitary confinement and repeatedly told to go back to Iraq.

On 26 August 2000, Munjed was finally freed. Now, fourteen years later, he is one of the world's leading osseointegration surgeons, transforming the lives of amputees with a pioneering technique that allows them to walk again.

Walking Free is Munjed's extraordinary account of his journey from the brutality of Saddam Hussein's Iraq to a new life in Australia and a remarkable career at the forefront of medicine.

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